A Blog from the Sea of Cortez – Part 3

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Chilling out on the islandDay 3, June 2nd (San Jose Island)

“Cafe Grande please!” That’s Michael. He’s a late riser and a big person. By this time, Tio Guero knew he would have to prepare enough coffee and food for Michael. Michael always starts his morning begging for a grande coffee.

Luis, who was showing off his very nice-looking Puma sneakers for hiking, was put out when the soles fell off yesterday. “Now I realize why they were selling it two-for-one!” They look more like boxing shoes today.

Pod of common dolphins in the Sea of CortezAfter breakfast, we gathered our things so we could move to the next point, which was San Jose Island. We became more efficient in what we did through the course of the journey.

It’s not just about arriving to the island, but also getting there. You see a lot of marine life along the way. The vast sea seems as empty as the desert until suddenly a dark beast bursts through the surface. We were laughing with excitement at a big school of common dolphins herding us along on the way to El Pardito, where we made a quick stop.

El ParditoThe guests said El Pardito was an impressive little island. The family (and three previous generations) who lives there is very warm and hospitable; they always invite people in to their home. Some of us asked, “How can people live with so little and be so happy?”

In 1916, a fifteen-year-old seeking the life of Robinson Crusoe on his own desert island settled here. Don Juan Cuevas Ramirez died at age 75, but not before he had sired three generations closely linked to the sea.

El Pardito VillageEl Pardito is about 150 km northwest of La Paz, between the islands of San Francisquito and San Jose. Its little chapel, school, solar-driven desalinization plant and radio help the isolated, tiny family community survive in this remote outpost on the Sea of Cortez.

These days overfishing by big international entities and illegal poachers threaten their modest livelihood. The need for national and international conservation pressure is great to preserve our Baja legacy.

The tiniest fishing village in the Sea of CortezThe younger generation has turned to music to supplement the islet economy – three of them have formed a ranchera band. The songs of Los Grandes Del Pardito celebrate the life of the island family.

We left the little island fishing village and headed to the mangroves of San Jose Island. First it was ocean and desert, and then suddenly you come into an area that is so green that the contrast between the colors is hard to comprehend.

Palma Sola BeachOn the way to the beach Palma Sola Island we saw another school of common dolphins churning up the blue. Palma Sola is called “lonely palm tree” because there is one sole palm tree on the beach, making you feel like you came across an oasis in the middle of the desert. But we couldn’t feel alone in the wilderness with that friendly squad of dolphins racing alongside.

We camped on this island beach for the night. First we anchored and then immediately provided shade and fresh water to everyone. This time people were more energetic and knew what to do.

Agua VerdeDay 4, June 3rd (Agua Verde Island)

Agua Verde is a beautiful place. The water is greener here because the type of sea bottom, the color of the rocks and sand there is lighter.

Oscar Ramirez, the other Oscar on the journey, expressed amazement at the beauty of his land. He feels prouder than ever to be a native of Baja California Sur and share his Baja heritage with us.

Ricky Ricky et alWe saw Don Jose, a person whom we met on our first islands trip back in 2009, during the flu outbreak.

Ricky Ricky is Mr. Everything. He cooks and helps out with everything. With his positive attitude, nothing is too difficult for him. Cabo Expeditions is lucky to have him on our team!

As we prepared for sleep tonight, we drank in the beauty of the stars so close and bright. The next day we would discover stars of many colors at the place we were to name “Stars under the Sea.”

To be continued…

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Oscar

About Oscar

Oscar founded the company in 1997. He was born and raised in Mexico City, where he studied Tourism Administration.

Oscar is devoted to his family. He values the inner peace that comes with perseverance and loyalty. Oscar is also an avid photographer, so many of the company’s images are his. They reflect his creativity and passion.

Favorite stories: The six-year-old who could identify different whale species. From a collection of miniatures she pointed to a toy gray whale and said “I want to see this whale!” Now 18, she and her mom have been coming back ever since.

Then there was the humpback tangled in a fishing net that Oscar helped to rescue. “I was able to at look at it eye-to-eye, soul-to-soul. When I hugged her and kissed her above the eye, I felt she was grateful for our help.”

One thought on “A Blog from the Sea of Cortez – Part 3

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